Episcopal Diocese of Virginia
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Seeing the Face of God in One Another Workshop

Anti-racism Workshop

2/17/2018
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

St. Mark's Parish Hall
6744 South Kings Hwy 
Alexandria, VA 22306
Driving Directions

Note: Registration is now Closed

On Feb.16th and 17th, St. Mark's will be hosting the workshop "Seeing the Face of God in One Another". A program of the Episcopal Church, founded at the initiative of our Presiding Bishop, The Rt. Rev. Michael Curry, it is being presented with the hope that all Clergy, Lay leaders, and members of the church will spend time in this essential dialogue. 

As hosts, we have been asked to assist in welcoming Episcopalians from the Washington D.C. area, Friday night, beginning at 5:00, and again Saturday morning, at 8:00. Help is needed as Greeters, Hosts, and in preparing a light dinner Friday night, Breakfast and lunch on Saturday. You do not need to attend the entire workshop if you can only assist in preparation. We expect between 30 and 40 participants. A fuller description of the program is below. 

 "The Antiracism Training and Action program of the Episcopal Church is a process for dismantling racism in the church and in society. This methodology promotes learning which is both experiential and intellectual. The first goal of this methodology is that participants will be able to analyze the dynamics of power and oppression so that they can engage in the visioning of an alternate reality for the church and society. That vision for us is the creation of the Beloved Community. However, in constructing the foundation of a just and equitable church and society, we must first receive training to understand the building blocks of racism and oppression so that we can truly become antiracists. This will occur on the personal, interpersonal, institutional, and systemic levels.

A second goal of the training program and, indeed, of the Episcopal Church as articulated in its resolutions is the transformation of the racist structures in this church as a means of transforming society. Too often, our church and all institutions of faith have rejected Paul’s admonition in the twelfth chapter of the epistle to the Romans and have conformed to the racist, oppressive standards of the world and have not been beacons of transformative light which can lead to full equity and liberation for all. e crux of this second goal is to shine the light of truth on the predominant and historic Euro-centric focus of this country and to change it into the leading antiracist multicultural and fully inclusive country on the face of this planet. Those who are interested in the history of the church’s commitment to the elimination of racism are directed to the Archives of the Episcopal Church and the “History of the Church’s Commitment to Antiracism" .